Bobcat attack?

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Tracker
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Bobcat attack?

Post by Tracker » Fri Dec 28, 2007 11:27 pm

Did anyone hear anything about the person attacked by a bobcat at Furnace Creek? Seems kind of weird. :???:

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Post by Scott » Sat Dec 29, 2007 8:44 am

This cat started hanging around the Inn (the staff may have been feeding it) and then actually jumped up on the shoulders of a woman. She had tiny puncture wounds but if that bobcat had actually been attacking her, she'd have been in the hospital.
I think it wasn't really attacking but doing what habituated bobcats do, and when she, understandably, panicked and tried to get away, the cat dug in to try and hang on, just like with a housecat.

Not clear on whether there were one or two episodes like this, but eventually the Inn security tried to trap it, which from the first-hand account I heard was pretty funny. It was described to me as a Keystone Cops scene.

Eventually a couple of LE rangers shot it.

Most likely it was either a domesticated or at least habituated bobcat that got dropped off by someone, maybe from a zoo near L.A.

Even if the staff at the Inn were feeding it (which they may have been) it's a bit much for a truly wild bobcat to start jumping on people. Even the coyotes don't like to get too close.

The whole thing is eerily similar to the tiger attack here in the Bay Area!

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Post by Dave » Sat Dec 29, 2007 11:03 am

I'm curious , are Bobcats seen much near Furnace Creek?I've never seen one there or anywhere in Death Valley.
Nature is indifferent to our love, but never unfaithful. ~Ed Abbey

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Post by Scott » Sat Dec 29, 2007 8:40 pm

Probably seen more often around F.C. than anywhere else, if only because of the easy food and the people that feed wildlife.

They're fairly common in the park, but they're (normally) nocturnal and shy.

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Dezdan
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Post by Dezdan » Sun Dec 30, 2007 1:27 am

Dave wrote:I'm curious , are Bobcats seen much near Furnace Creek?I've never seen one there or anywhere in Death Valley.
Not as common as the coyotes (:roll:), though more common the Ringtail Cats from what I have observed. I've seen a few Bobcats the last couple months stretching from MM107 on Hwy 190 to about MM112.5, and then again near MM129. With construction taking place both at the FC Ranch in the date grove and in and around the springs above the FC Inn, their habitat has been slightly invaded.

In respect to the increased number of sightings, DEVA's Wildlife Biologist noted that there "are probably two environmental factors contributing to the number of bobcats that have been seen this year. One is the rainfall and wildflower season of 2005, which increased the prey base for the predators, leading to successful reproduction and higher survivability. The second is the drought, which has now pushed predators into urban areas in search of food.

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Post by Dave » Mon Dec 31, 2007 1:05 am


I'll have to keep my eyes peeled for those Bobcats when We go to DV in FEB.Would love to see one. I would really love to see a Ringtail Cat :grin: Any ideas where and when to look? -Dave
Nature is indifferent to our love, but never unfaithful. ~Ed Abbey

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Post by greatbasinguide » Mon Dec 31, 2007 7:30 pm

Be near a water source at sunset or sunrise.

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Post by Dave » Tue Jan 01, 2008 4:07 pm

Will do that the next trip to DV( Hope February) :nod: The Ring tail Cat is a animal that many people wouldn't guess it resides in the Desert or in CA for that matter.
Nature is indifferent to our love, but never unfaithful. ~Ed Abbey

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Post by RL » Thu Jan 03, 2008 12:16 am

Oh Yeah. We have a place 100 miles North of DV and there is definately a cat issue this winter. Our neighbor, a hay farmer, has had 60+ birds killed by Bob Cats since August of this year. One attack saw 56 chickens dead. Also-had a Sheep drug over a big fence by a Mt. Lion. Had many many (dozens) of encounters with Coyotes this year preying on his animals (or attempting to). Big wolve-like grey coyotes which seem to be different than the usual scuffy reddish yellow types seen in the flats here.

Also-In Tonopah proper, they killed a lion which had taken up residence in an abandoned auto and was preying on small dogs and cats in a small neighborhood. They figured it was a matter of time until children were the next meal for that bold cat.

Everyone attributes this unusual predator behavior in this area to the drought and these animals moving in for food and water...
Rats...Desert Rats...Rats

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Post by Tracker » Thu Jan 03, 2008 8:52 pm

Thanks for the response Scott. I would also tend to think that some moron was feeding it. This kind of thing is virtually unheard of with bobcats unless they're rabid or tame.

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Bobcat Story

Post by oldtrailmaster » Wed Jan 09, 2008 6:05 pm

Hi all,

I have no info on the bobcat attack issue, but thought you may enjoy reading about a personal encounter I had with one a couple years ago on the high crest of the Panamints:

My Mahogany Flat Bobcat

"How can it get any better than this? I am in the wild country I love once again, the weather is so warm that no jacket is needed, there isn’t a soul around for countless miles, and the only sounds are the occasional light breeze whispering through the pines and blackbirds who are very talkative. Occasionally, when a hawk will swoop closely over the treetops, I can hear the wind displaced by its large wings.

Well, it does get even better about three hours later, after camp is set, dinner has been consumed, and I am sitting quietly at the picnic table contemplating the beauty of it all.

Out of the corner of my left eye, a graceful form moves from behind a tree, across the wooded hillside before me. No noise accompanies what I am witnessing, and I immediately know why. Like a fog moving in on little cat’s feet, I am privileged to witness a cat, but not your everyday variety found in homes. This cat is huge, fur tinted on the yellow side with a whiter underbody, tall pointed ears with fuzzy tufts on top, and the telltale short tail.

Yes! Not more than ten feet from where I sit, a mountain bobcat is lazily sauntering by, little tail twitching slowly left and right, with eye expressions indicating an animal that is relaxed in my presence. I can not believe what is unfolding before me, for despite all the wild animals I have had close encounters with over the years, a member of the cat family has not been one of them. For the briefest of moments at first, I figure this bobcat has accidentally happened upon me since I am absolutely silent, but it becomes apparent after eye contact between us that there is full awareness.

As I always do with wild animals in travels, I speak gently to this creature, whose home I have chosen to share for three days. There seems to be a knowing acknowledgment that I mean no harm. My new friend does not run. After this elegant spirit disappears on the other side of my vehicle, I keep talking and move around to the driver’s side to fetch my digital camera ... I want this event to be brought home in photos!

To my delightful surprise, Bobby has spread out on the ground, just like a housecat would, seemingly interested in keeping my company for a while on the lonely forested mountain ridge. Maintaining my one-sided verbal conversation, I reach in the door, get the camera, and slowly move within eight feet of this gentle animal, who continues to look around without a care in the world, eyes lazily blinking from time to time, and tail still moving as one might think was indicative of happiness.

I memorialize the moment in pixels, knowing full-well that I am such a lucky guy to be in this situation, something that has never happened to me in my half-century-plus on this Earth, and something that may never occur again. Eventually, Bobby slowly arises, stretches, looks me in the eyes once again to say goodbye, and wanders off into the trees to the south, wholly unconcerned that I might follow. I watch in awe, loving the moments that I can spend with other species on perhaps a level that most people might suspect is not possible. I continue talking to Bobby long after I have no further visual contact, hoping that my sound waves are still having positive effects as they reach those tall pointed ears."
FOREVER WILD,
Steve Greene
www.WildDeathValley.com
Your Backcountry Guide to DVNP

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Bobcat attack

Post by TrailHound » Wed Jan 16, 2008 12:45 pm

The Morning Report now has this warning:

Do not feed or approach wildlife in the park. Keep Wildlife Wild and Be Safe!

I assume that this message is the result of the bobcat attack. If so, then someone was feeding the animal as suspected.

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RL
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Post by RL » Thu Mar 06, 2008 9:03 pm

Bob Cat attacks Boaters!! Ha HA HA

http://www.crosbylodge.com/fishing/plnews.htm
Rats...Desert Rats...Rats

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