Interactive Maps

Improvements? Wish List? Suggestions? List them here.
Lobo
Grubstaker
Posts: 296
Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2006 6:53 pm

Interactive Maps

Post by Lobo » Thu Jan 26, 2006 10:52 am

I was wondering if this site has considered making available interactive maps of Death Valley. I am thinking along the lines of maps that can be used for planning trips or trip reports. Maps that can be marked up by commentor/posters to routes taken and denote points of interest, perhaps? Kind of along the lines of the maps that Dezdan has posted in the past on the various wildfires but with an interface so that posters can add to that map.

Don't know how much bandwidth such a system would take or how hard it would be to integrate to this site, but seems that it would be a very useful feature for people planning trips as well as for people reporting on trips, unique sightening, wildflowers, mines, etc.

Here is an interesting article, <a href= "http://www.oreillynet.com/pub/a/network ... atial.html"> An Introduction to Open Source Geospatial Tools</a> [http://www.oreillynet.com/pub/a/network ... atial.html],
that goes over this subject and below are some sources of open source code/projects that I found that might be useful in implementing something like this.

Tried to post links to source codes and articles that I found but get an error message 403 ?

Bighorn
Moderator
Posts: 3002
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2006 9:17 am
Location: is everything

Post by Bighorn » Thu Jan 26, 2006 12:38 pm

Death-Valley.us is currently surviving on very limited resources and in the near future there will be further trimmings.

For the next year or so, the only updates will be cleaning up the code and content updates, unfortunately...

But even if budget would allow projects like this one, and lets say, someone would have enough time to develope web application (based on open source or from scratch), good enough to serve the purpose, we'd still need usable dataset.

Currently, there's no open source or public domain GIS datasets (bar the topomaps and low res satellite imagery) available for DVNP and vicinity, detailed enough to be really usefull for that kind of application.
It would have to be build from scratch and that would take some time.

So, in any case, if we go for it, it won't be available before 2008.
Lobo wrote:Tried to post links to source codes and articles that I found but get an error message 403?
Unfortunately some of the links contain string of characters matching those of several exploits. Could you send me an email with the links, so I can tweak the mod_security rules a bit or find another way around.

LarryW
Death Valley Resident
Posts: 636
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2006 12:04 am

Comment

Post by LarryW » Thu Jan 26, 2006 5:32 pm

Have you ever thought of seeking federal funding in the form of a grant? Just a thought...

Bighorn
Moderator
Posts: 3002
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2006 9:17 am
Location: is everything

Post by Bighorn » Sat Jan 28, 2006 2:55 am

All the current troubles are more of a temporary nature, so no, alternate budgeting wasn't considered nor it will be.

I have to say though that I like the Lobo's idea very much. However, as I have mentioned in my first post, there are few requirements.
If somebody finds usable and accessible dataset for Death Valley area, than it might be up and running in 2007 instead of 2008.

User avatar
ahamacav
Death Valley Resident
Posts: 1170
Joined: Tue Jun 27, 2006 7:37 am
Location: Eat, ME.
Contact:

Post by ahamacav » Sat Jan 28, 2006 5:51 am

I find this kind of stuff fascinating. Could you define dataset?
Visit my web site, everyday, ... all day long - http://digital-desert.com/

Maceo
Jayhawker
Posts: 13
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2006 12:04 am

How is the site supported?

Post by Maceo » Sat Jan 28, 2006 8:18 am

Have you considered a paypal link or something similar so that readers could help out?

Lobo
Grubstaker
Posts: 296
Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2006 6:53 pm

Post by Lobo » Sat Jan 28, 2006 9:20 am

ahamacav wrote
I find this kind of stuff fascinating. Could you define dataset?
Ahamacav, like you I was unaware of what exactly is involved in this, other than it sounded neat and would make this site that much more unique, not to mention that I love maps :D
Perhaps the explaination I found and posted below will help answer your question(s), I found it helpful. As I get more time I will try to do some more looking, appears that some GIS datasets are available but not one that shows trails/roads.

Going by this info.

http://www.nps.gov/gis/gis_program/gis_council.html
"The NPS has developed a program to help parks build GIS databases and to provide the expertise needed to use GIS to support decision making. The GIS Program provides a technical support network and coordinates GIS use throughout the parks."


www.nps.gov/gis/mapbook/mappingparks/esri_map_book.doc

"This article details the steps entailed in transforming a paper geologic map to a user-friendly digital geologic map and database. In short the paper geologic map is scanned and the resulting image is georeferenced, providing a background for the digitization (capture) of geologic features. In accordance with the NPS Geology-GIS Data Model, the spatial and geologic feature types present (i.e. polygon, line, point and fault, fold, unit, etc.) are captured into appropriate GIS coverages and attributed as per the Data Model. These data are then incorporated into the NPS GIS Theme Manager that facilitates (in ArcView 3.2) the presentation of the various map coverages along with any FGDC metadata and accompanying help files that display map notes, unit descriptions and other ancillary data from the original paper source map. Any map graphics (e.g. geologic cross sections) are scanned from the original paper map and hotlinked to a coverage (e.g. in this case the cross section line coverage) on the digital geologic map. These data are then posted on the NPS I&M GIS Clearinghouse website for user access and download.

The Geologic Resource Inventory is a cooperative effort of the NPS Geologic Resources Division (Lakewood, Colo.) and the Natural Resource Information Division Inventory and Monitoring Program (Fort Collins, Colo.). To date 58 parks have been scoped and another 18 are proposed for fiscal year 2002. Additionally, 235 of the 272 geologic bibliographies are completed (found at http://165.83.36.151/biblios/geobib.nsf; NOTE: user name is "geobib read" and password is "anybody") and 16 parks have digital geologic maps available for download at ftp://gis01.nature.nps.gov//data/nrdata/geology/.(INSERT code 4-letter NPS)"

LarryW
Death Valley Resident
Posts: 636
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2006 12:04 am

Post by LarryW » Sat Jan 28, 2006 10:25 am

"The NPS has developed a program to help parks build GIS databases and to provide the expertise needed to use GIS to support decision making. The GIS Program provides a technical support network and coordinates GIS use throughout the parks."


www.nps.gov/gis/mapbook/mappingparks/esri_map_book.doc

"This article details the steps entailed in transforming a paper geologic map to a user-friendly digital geologic map and database. In short the paper geologic map is scanned and the resulting image is georeferenced, providing a background for the digitization (capture) of geologic features. In accordance with the NPS Geology-GIS Data Model, the spatial and geologic feature types present (i.e. polygon, line, point and fault, fold, unit, etc.) are captured into appropriate GIS coverages and attributed as per the Data Model. These data are then incorporated into the NPS GIS Theme Manager that facilitates (in ArcView 3.2) the presentation of the various map coverages along with any FGDC metadata and accompanying help files that display map notes, unit descriptions and other ancillary data from the original paper source map. Any map graphics (e.g. geologic cross sections) are scanned from the original paper map and hotlinked to a coverage (e.g. in this case the cross section line coverage) on the digital geologic map. These data are then posted on the NPS I&M GIS Clearinghouse website for user access and download.

The Geologic Resource Inventory is a cooperative effort of the NPS Geologic Resources Division (Lakewood, Colo.) and the Natural Resource Information Division Inventory and Monitoring Program (Fort Collins, Colo.). To date 58 parks have been scoped and another 18 are proposed for fiscal year 2002. Additionally, 235 of the 272 geologic bibliographies are completed (found at http://165.83.36.151/biblios/geobib.nsf; NOTE: user name is "geobib read" and password is "anybody") and 16 parks have digital geologic maps available for download at ftp://gis01.nature.nps.gov//data/nrdata/geology/.(INSERT code 4-letter NPS)"
Well that explains everything!

User avatar
ahamacav
Death Valley Resident
Posts: 1170
Joined: Tue Jun 27, 2006 7:37 am
Location: Eat, ME.
Contact:

Post by ahamacav » Sat Jan 28, 2006 11:21 am

Lobo wrote:...unaware ... love ... not ... "The NPS..." ... facilitates... metadata ... ancillary ... anybody ... and 16 parks ... 4-letter NPS)"
I tend to oversimplify, but basically needed data sets and access would be;

Datasets
Roads (point sequences)
Trails (stemming from roads)
Points of Interest/Theme (along trails, roads)

User input
New points
New sequences
New comments at theme, points or sequences


Management thereof.

???
Visit my web site, everyday, ... all day long - http://digital-desert.com/

Lobo
Grubstaker
Posts: 296
Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2006 6:53 pm

Post by Lobo » Sat Jan 28, 2006 1:08 pm

ahamacav wrote
I tend to oversimplify, but basically needed data sets and access would be;

Datasets
Roads (point sequences)
Trails (stemming from roads)
Points of Interest/Theme (along trails, roads)
The biggest data set would be the topo data for all of Death Valley at an acceptable resolution.

Bighorn wrote
Currently, there's no open source or public domain GIS datasets (bar the topomaps and low res satellite imagery) available for DVNP and vicinity, detailed enough to be really usefull for that kind of application.
It would have to be build from scratch and that would take some time.
So anyone interested in helping find a data set?

One data set (geological) that I found only had a resolution of approx 30sec which would be about a half mile resolution, if 1min = approx 1 mile.

User avatar
ahamacav
Death Valley Resident
Posts: 1170
Joined: Tue Jun 27, 2006 7:37 am
Location: Eat, ME.
Contact:

Post by ahamacav » Sat Jan 28, 2006 1:33 pm

I would think that topo data, being the largest dataset and most difficult to obtain and manage would be of the lowest priority.
Visit my web site, everyday, ... all day long - http://digital-desert.com/

User avatar
ahamacav
Death Valley Resident
Posts: 1170
Joined: Tue Jun 27, 2006 7:37 am
Location: Eat, ME.
Contact:

Sew Anyhow

Post by ahamacav » Tue Jan 31, 2006 6:50 am

I would think that topo data, being the largest dataset and most difficult to obtain and manage would be of the lowest priority.
Something I've been fooling with:

http://digital-desert.com/map-sys/death-valley-sat.html
"Do the easy stuff first; In case you have a heart attack, more fun, less work."
-- Some dude in the desert
I could use some feedback.
Visit my web site, everyday, ... all day long - http://digital-desert.com/

User avatar
Dezdan
Moderator
Posts: 3819
Joined: Mon Nov 04, 2002 10:53 am
Location: Nevada
Contact:

Post by Dezdan » Tue Jan 31, 2006 7:22 am

The Google Maps API is nice for urban settings, but its Death Valley satellite coverage is very lacking. In your set up, I think it would be more useful to the user if you allowed them to switch over to street maps vs. the lacking satellite coverage. What may be more useful then the street/satellite coverage to your users is the ability to view topographic maps, which is a mod that can be done to Google Maps API.

~Dezdan

User avatar
ahamacav
Death Valley Resident
Posts: 1170
Joined: Tue Jun 27, 2006 7:37 am
Location: Eat, ME.
Contact:

Post by ahamacav » Tue Jan 31, 2006 8:11 am

Dezdan wrote:The Google Maps API is nice for urban settings, but its Death Valley satellite coverage is very lacking. In your set up, I think it would be more useful to the user if you allowed them to switch over to street maps vs. the lacking satellite coverage. What may be more useful then the street/satellite coverage to your users is the ability to view topographic maps, which is a mod that can be done to Google Maps API.

~Dezdan
The problem so far is that there are errors in the map coverage for the death valley area. At this point, rather than confuse with incomplete map coverage, I chose to run with the satellite until I come up with polyline data for the erroneous areas. For current/immediate development purposes, I'm looking at interaction with available images.

You have any shortcuts to a mod for the topos? I haven't been into the game long enough to be familiar with map (swapping) use.
Visit my web site, everyday, ... all day long - http://digital-desert.com/

User avatar
Dezdan
Moderator
Posts: 3819
Joined: Mon Nov 04, 2002 10:53 am
Location: Nevada
Contact:

Post by Dezdan » Thu Feb 09, 2006 4:53 pm

ahamacav wrote:You have any shortcuts to a mod for the topos? I haven't been into the game long enough to be familiar with map (swapping) use.
I have been racking my brain trying to remember where I saw the simple topo map option for the Google Maps API. If I find it again, I will post a URL. In the mean time, this is the closet I have found to it: http://www.dasnet.org/node/101

Post Reply