Shotgun Kitty

of Death Valley and vicinity
Post Reply
Toni_xx_cheerbabexx
Jayhawker
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2006 12:04 am

Shotgun Kitty

Post by Toni_xx_cheerbabexx » Tue Oct 04, 2005 4:04 pm

I want to know if anybody has some interesting information about Kathryn L. Marbaker Tubb. She is one of the most prominent women I have found that laid her business at the old Death Valley Junction, than later moved to Ash Meadows after a pipe burst while running pipes to and from Ash Meadows to DVJ. I know she was called Shotgun Kitty, because she never went anywhere without her gun. If anyone has some other info, or good books for me to look into, I would greatly appreciate it. I just love her stories.

Robin
Grubstaker
Posts: 378
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2006 12:04 am

Post by Robin » Wed Oct 05, 2005 9:12 am

There is a very brief bio of Shotgun Kitty Tubb here: http://www.unr.edu/wrc/nwhp/biograph/tubb.htm

She is also profiled in the Death Valley Women's History Exhibit at the Shoshone Museum. This February, at the Nevada Boomtown History Conference at Longstreet's in Amargosa, Judy Palmer will be presenting a paper on Kitty Tubb and her life in Death Valley Junction and Ash Meadows. Apart from that, there is not much written about Kitty Tubb that I know to be accessible on the internet.

Kitty actually left Death Valley Junction in 1914 after she and her husband Bob Tubb were divorced. He remained at the Junction to continue operating the store, saloon, and hotel they had established together and she moved to a ranch at Ash Meadows.

Toni_xx_cheerbabexx
Jayhawker
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2006 12:04 am

Post by Toni_xx_cheerbabexx » Wed Oct 05, 2005 6:00 pm

ooo that's interesting I didn't know that he stayed. I know that they got divorced that She remarried twice after that, but I didn't know that Robert Tubb kept it going. Thanks

Toni_xx_cheerbabexx
Jayhawker
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2006 12:04 am

Post by Toni_xx_cheerbabexx » Thu Oct 06, 2005 8:04 pm

It just clicked on me who her second husband was... Jesse Wiley. Now why does that ring a bell. If someone can tell me if i am right, isn't he one of the Wiley's who created the Hidden Hills Ranch out in pahrump, NV? Or am I thinking of a different Wiley? let me know, this will help my search.

Toni_xx_cheerbabexx
Jayhawker
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2006 12:04 am

Post by Toni_xx_cheerbabexx » Thu Oct 06, 2005 8:06 pm

Sorry I didn't realize that it takes a moment to go into the forum. I don't know how to erase it. Sorry.

bglinc@me.com
Jayhawker
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2016 9:49 pm

Post by bglinc@me.com » Thu Dec 15, 2016 7:59 am

Hello, I very rarely google my great grandmother Kitty Tubb, my name is Bradley Land and you will have to forgive me as I never met her. She passed before I was born. My grandfather was George Washington Tubb, my mom Maureen his daughter. I have a bunch of first cousins that still live throughout the desert and Nevada. I lost contact with them shortly after my mom and my grandfathers brothers daughters sold the family ranch. I think it was the late 90s. I only met my uncle Robert Tubb a few times, my Cousin's Judy, Nancy and Virginia a few times. I was dropped off a few times when I was kid to spend time with my great uncle Bob on the ranch. I often get fired up when I hear inaccurate portrayals of my great grandmother. But, I thought this chain of notes was the pursuit of the truth. This is what I know, in the late 1800s early 1900s my great grandma carried a shotgun for a variety of reasons all the time. Primarily from what I was told and only my cousins if still alive could weigh in more accurately. Kitty Tubb was amazing, she built the first school house in Death Valley Junction for a variety of reasons. Her children needed an education. They needed help with the ranch, the Shoshone Indians needed work and she needed help. Their children needed an education, Kitty allowed them to get their education with her children in a one room school house. She could only afford to pay so much, so she hired some of the Shoshone that she befriended and loved. And, every morning stood on the school porch ringing the bells to call the children for there schooling, with a shot gun in hand to protect them. She was never a bandit, she was a woman that was pioneer in a very rough unsettled part of the United States with water rights on her land. The land was amazing if I remember correctly, it had ponds and streams, mud holes to play in and was simply amazing. This is what I remember as being told to me wether accurate or not, I have some of her heirlooms still remaining, gifts from the Shoshone that probably need a little restoration now that they are antiques. I wish I had more, I will be donating those items to the California State Museum with a notation from me such as this... the story about her youngest son is true, he also didn't live long from what I was told. She was a woman of compassion, strength at a daring time in the development of our country, she was an activist in every sense of the word. I wish you well in pursuing her truth as I would like to learn more. I was told many stories, but always remember the familiar truths. I hope this helps you all. I am the last member of her clan in Pasadena now, as my great uncle's wife was moved out of here in the late 90s, my mom transitioned in 2000. My dear brother is on the east coast. And, that's the story from Pasadena. Keep pursuing the truth, my people are around...

User avatar
MojaveGeek
Death Valley Resident
Posts: 1968
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2008 5:22 pm
Location: Boston

Post by MojaveGeek » Thu Dec 15, 2016 6:21 pm

Wow that's nice to hear. It's always cool when someone living connects with the past on a forum like this.

User avatar
ETAV8R
Grubstaker
Posts: 204
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 1:25 am

Post by ETAV8R » Sat Dec 17, 2016 10:08 pm

Very cool indeed. Thank you for sharing.

User avatar
Death Valley Dazed
Death Valley Resident
Posts: 546
Joined: Tue Jun 30, 2015 7:24 pm
Location: Utah

Thanks for sharing about Shotgun Kitty Tubb

Post by Death Valley Dazed » Mon Dec 19, 2016 7:07 pm

The details of your family history will sure bring much more enjoyment to my next visit to DVNP as I will be thinking about this pioneer woman and her accomplishments back then.

I wish you would swing a family reunion in order to gather more stories and artifacts for the rest of us to enjoy online and at the museums.

Thanks so much for sharing!
Life begins in Death Valley

Post Reply