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Hiking the Mojave Desert by Michel Digonnet

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SteveH
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Hiking the Mojave Desert by Michel Digonnet

Post by SteveH » Wed Jun 19, 2013 11:45 pm

Michel Digonnet has officially released his new book on hiking in the Mojave desert, specifically Mojave National Preserve. I know he has put several years of hard work into putting this book together and so I've really been looking forward to reading it for a long time. I've also held off on planning a trip to Mojave Preserve until his book came out, so that I could first read the book and plan my first trip there accordingly. I should have my copy of the book this weekend and then I'm going to sit down and read it. I will post a review here after I am done. It will probably take me a week or so, since the book is jam packed with 462 pages... a wealth of information. I'm sure more options will arrive soon for ordering the new book, but for now you can preview the cover and book info through the Amazon link below.

Hiking the Mojave Desert: The Natural and Cultural Heritage of Mojave National Preserve

By Michel Digonnet

THE THIRD LARGEST DESERT PARK in the country, Mojave National Preserve protects 1.6 million acres of spectacular arid lands at the heart of the Mojave Desert. Part of the celebrated Great Basin province, it is a spellbinding region of mighty mountain ranges rising thousands of feet above vast inland basins. Famous for the majestic Kelso Dunes, the Devils Playground, and the world's largest Joshua tree forest, the preserve also holds considerable natural and cultural wealth, including a wild range of landscapes, striking plant communities, and a rich mining past. Above all, it is a land of contrasts, alternatively forlorn and vibrant with life, stark and colorful, blanketed in snow in the winter, awash with wildflowers in the spring, and scorching hot in the summer. Being high-desert country and generally a little cooler than Death Valley, topographically less rugged, and far less visited, it offers a tremendous potential for comparatively easier hiking in complete solitude.

This book is an invitation to desert lovers to explore this little-known gem. Meticulously researched, it provides valuable information about the geology, mining history, wildlife, and botany of the beautiful region. Illustrated with plenty of custom topographic maps, photographs, and hand drawings, it describes more than 80 hiking destinations as varied as rugged canyons and lofty summits, salt flats and eerie volcanic plateaus, lush springs and pine forests, cactus gardens, rock art, and a healthy collection of mines, camps, and ghost towns.

http://www.amazon.com/Hiking-Mojave-Des ... 0965917827
Last edited by SteveH on Fri Jun 21, 2013 10:21 pm, edited 2 times in total.

shane
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Post by shane » Thu Jun 20, 2013 8:46 am

That's great, I wish I had that book in April when I made my first trip to the preserve. It was too hot to do much hiking, but at least we saw a tortoise for the first time.

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MojaveGeek
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Post by MojaveGeek » Thu Jun 20, 2013 10:46 am

thanks for posting that news, Steve

SteveH
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Post by SteveH » Fri Jun 21, 2013 9:58 pm

I got my copy of the new book today! So excited to open it and look through the chapter titles, check out some of the maps, and browse the photos. My initial impression is that Hiking the Mojave Preserve is incredibly well done. Now I am going to start reading it so I can post a review maybe by next weekend. The front cover shows a picture of Carruthers Canyon, which looks to be one of the highlights of the Preserve. I had never even heard of that place before this book. But reading through the chapter on it, it sounds spectacular. One other note... on page 3 it says "By the same author:" and then it lists the two Death Valley books. Below that, it says "Hiking Joshua Tree National Park (in preparation)". So guess what we are getting next?

Here are some higher resolution cover photos--

Image

Image

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ETAV8R
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Post by ETAV8R » Sun Jun 23, 2013 10:44 pm

Ordered my copy yesterday. Looking forward to checking it out. Mojave was my first "camping" trip with my truck and followed a trip to the Panamints with friends a year prior. I already have a couple other books on the preserve to go with this one.

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crazybill
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Post by crazybill » Thu Nov 28, 2013 10:22 am

Hey guys, any further opinions on this book?
-Bill-

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ETAV8R
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Post by ETAV8R » Sun Dec 01, 2013 11:48 pm

Not into this one too deeply yet. DV has my attention most of the time. I was just up in the Panamints this past weekend and used the Western DV Hiking book quite a bit.

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crazybill
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Post by crazybill » Mon Dec 02, 2013 8:32 am

I ordered this book a couple days ago, along with one of his Death Valley guides.
This author is new to me, although he evidently has a few books on the Death Valley and has a good reputation here.
It is this book on the MNP that attracted my attention. My primary 'area of interest' is the Preserve and other areas south of it. I love to track down petroglyphs and photograph them. Understandably, it is hard to find good information on locations given the damage that has been done to some of the more well known locations.
I am not attracted to the Death Valley area so much, but I do have an interest in the Owlshead mountians.
Solitude appeals to me. I love a good hike but at 64 years old my horizons have shortened a bit. A good guidebook or other accurate directions help avoid a lot of aimless wandering.
-Bill-

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ETAV8R
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Post by ETAV8R » Mon Dec 02, 2013 10:02 am

Bill,

I too love finding petros/pictos out and about. Unfortunately as you noted information is hard to find regarding their locations. Digonnet's books do not list locations for petros/pictos. I understand why, especially after the recent vandalism/theft in Owens Valley. The Mojave book does list a couple leads which is more than his western Death Valley text. Good luck.

agtoau
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Post by agtoau » Mon Dec 02, 2013 6:11 pm

Death Valley Jim has been scouring the desert for petroglyphs and pictographs. He has also published a bit -

http://deathvalleyjim.com/secret-places ... ve-desert/

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ETAV8R
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Post by ETAV8R » Mon Sep 26, 2016 4:36 pm

Just wanted to note that a 2nd Edition for this book was released this past April. The book description does list more pages than the 1st edition. If anyone has info about the changes to the 2nd edition please share. Thanks.

https://www.amazon.com/Hiking-Death-Val ... 900&sr=1-4

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Candace_66
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Post by Candace_66 » Wed Oct 19, 2016 11:15 pm

Thanks for posting this! I hadn't been aware of this update. I will be ordering it shortly.

Meanwhile, here's some information from one of the Amazon reviews:
This second edition differs from the first primarily in the elimination of the small section on the northwestern parts of the park (Saline and Eureka valleys) since a few years ago Digonnet released an entire new book on that region which included the same hikes. In place of that section the 2nd edition now includes an entirely new section on the Owlshead Mountains in the extreme southern part of the park. This new section includes the usual excellent write up of that region including its geology and natural history along with six new hikes. There are also a few new hikes sprinkled through the sections that remain from the first edition.

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ETAV8R
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Post by ETAV8R » Fri Oct 21, 2016 7:34 pm

Thanks. Already picked up the new version. I like the cover from the old one better though. But we all know a book should not be judged by its cover.

Sparky of SoCal
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Post by Sparky of SoCal » Fri Oct 21, 2016 8:05 pm

I know he has some maps with notes and all but 2016 GPS notes would have been nice.

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Candace_66
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Post by Candace_66 » Sun Oct 23, 2016 8:15 pm

Sparky of SoCal wrote:I know he has some maps with notes and all but 2016 GPS notes would have been nice.
I guess he's "old school"? :lol:

Just ordered my copy from Amazon yesterday. Interestingly, the listing said Amazon only had six copies left (but more on the way).

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